Traditional Garden11 Photos

Traditional Garden

Client Brief: The clients wanted to redesign both the back and the front areas of their newly acquired property. The primary objective for the back garden was to achieve a private, peaceful, and relaxing garden space, providing a feel that would be natural, organic, and verdant.

Traditional Garden

The gently curved path leading from the house to the garage slows the visitor’s eye and increases the perceived depth of this relatively shallow space, as the eye moves from side to side rather than directly to the rear of the garden.

Traditional Garden

The repetition of the plant material along the path further emphasizes the curve by adding a three-dimensional quality, introduces rhythm in the composition, and unifies the planting areas.

Traditional Garden

Trees and shrubs are positioned to increase privacy, to provide shade, and to conceal parts of the garden making it visually larger.

Traditional Garden

A basalt gurgler generates white noise, increasing privacy in the seating area and encouraging wildlife in the garden.

Traditional Garden

Attention to detail is particularly important in small spaces. Here we used a recessed tray cover, filled with Pennsylvania Blue Stone, to conceal a manhole cover.

Traditional Garden

Client Brief: The goal for the front garden was to enhance the curb appeal and to increase privacy screening.

Traditional Garden

The mixture of trees, shrubs, and perennials is planted densely to produce a luxuriant effect that is also weed-suppressing.

Traditional Garden

The front garden and the city’s boulevard are densely planted with a high proportion of evergreen shrubs to provide privacy screening.

Traditional Garden

Several interesting Japanese maples are featured in this project, including Acer japonicum Meigetsu, Acer palmatum ‘Emperor I’, and our favourite Acer tegmentosum ‘Joe Witt’ with its beautiful striated bark.

Traditional Garden

Planting Plan for a traditional garden.